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The US House passes the bill to reopen some agencies shut down in the wall fight



WASHINGTON, JANUARY 11 (Reuters) – The Democratically Controlled US House of Representatives voted on Friday to restore the funding of federal agencies closed by a fight with President Donald Trump on cross-border funding, which some 800,000 Government workers, from tax collectors to FBI agents, missed their first payslip.

However, a complete resumption of government operations did not appear in sight because Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has said he will not bring the house bill to the vote. Republicans, who control the Senate, have so far been with Trump and insisted that all expense bills contain money for their wall.

The house bill, which passed 240-179 with only a handful of Republicans supporting it, would restore funding to the Inland Department and the Environmental Protection Agency, two of the agencies that have been out of funding since December 22, in the midst of the standoff over it. proposed wall along the US-Mexico border. The bill gives $ 35.9 billion in discretionary funding, $ 6 billion over Trump's budget application and $ 601 million over financial year 2018.

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Furloughed workers protesting between government decommissioning

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Union workers are demonstrating in front of the White House against government closure on January 10, 2019 in Washington, DC. – US President Donald Trump led Thursday to the US-Mexico border to push his demand for a wall one day after he left negotiations with Democrats in a political crisis paralyzing the government. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo Credit To Be Read NICHOLAS CAMS / AFP / Getty Images)

EU Members and Internal Services Work Outside an IRS Service Center to Encourage Termination of the Partial Government Interruption Thursday, Jan 10, 2019, in Covington, Ky. (AP Photo / John Minchillo)

IRS employee Christine Helquist joins a federal protest rally outside the Federal Building on Thursday, January 10, 2019 in Ogden, Utah. Payday will come Friday without any control for about 800,000 federal employees affected by government interruption, forcing workers to cut costs, cancel trips, apply for unemployment benefits, and take out loans to stay fluid. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

IRS employee Angela Gran, center and other attending a federal protest rally outside the Federal Building, Thursday, January 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. Payday will come Friday without any control for about 800,000 federal employees affected by government interruption, forcing workers to cut costs, cancel trips, apply for unemployment benefits, and take out loans to stay fluid. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

Cheryl Monroe, right, an employee of the Food and Drug Administration, and Bertrice Sanders, an employee of the Social Security Administration, rally to end the partial interruption of government in Detroit, Thursday, January. 10, 2019. (AP Photo / Paul Sancya)

Government workers oppose the partial government decommissioning at Federal Plaza, Thursday, January 10, 2019, in Chicago. The partial end of government continues to pull on hundreds of thousands of federal workers outside the job or work without pay as the border wall struggle continues. (AP Photo / Kiichiro Sato)

People gather during a federal protest rally at the Federal Building on Thursday, January 10, 2019 in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

People gathering during a federal protest rally in the Federal Building on Thursday, January 10, 2019 in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

Furloughed TSA employee Marae Persson shows attending a federal protest rally at the Federal Building on Thursday, January 10, 2019 in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

Furloughed National Park Service ranks Kathryn Gilson, center, listens as innate ranger Sean Ghazala, left, speaks to the media Thursday, January 10, 2019 during a press conference and rally at Staten Island La Colmena Center in New York. Ghazala is based on Manhattan's African burial ground, and Gilson works at the Gateway National Recreation Area, a national park that includes wetlands around New York City and parts of New Jersey's coastline. Gilson says she is at home "jumping off the walls" and cares about paying her bills and student loans. Staten Island is a largely Republican New York City neighborhood, but Democrat Max Rose recently defeated his Republican opponent in the 2018 Congress election. (AP Photo / Kathy Willens)

People rally to end the partial interruption of government in Detroit, Thursday, January 10, 2019. (AP Photo / Paul Sancya)

Union members and other federal employees protest the government interruption on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, January 10, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

EU members protest at the government interruption on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, January 10, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Union Members and other federal employees stop in front of the White House in Washington during a rally to end the partial government termination, Thursday, January 10, 2019 .. (AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A protester holds a "Stop The Shutdown" during a rally with union members and federal staff to complete the partial government termination outside the White House in Washington, DC, USA, Thursday, January 10, 2019. Partial government termination Today's 20th day, since its influence is broader with about 800,000 federal workers who will miss their pay slips on Friday. Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Union workers demonstrate in front of the White House against the government's closure on January 10, 2019 in Washington, DC. – US President Donald Trump led Thursday to the US-Mexico border to push his demand for a wall one day after he left negotiations with Democrats in a political crisis paralyzing the government. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit to be read NICHOLAS CAMS / AFP / Getty Images)




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Trump faces the prospect of the longest US government's shutdown in history could declare a national emergency to bypass the congress to get funding for its wall, which was a key promise of its 2016 presidential campaign.

"Humanitarian crisis at our southern border," said Trump on Twitter Friday one day after visiting the Texas-Mexico border. "I've just come back and it's a far worse situation than anyone would understand, an invasion!"

On its 21st day, the partial shutdown on Friday ended the record to the longest in US history. Some 800,000 federal workers did not receive pay slips that would have gone out on Friday. Some have resorted to selling their belongings or sending appeals to online banks to help pay their bills.

"Most of them live from paycheck to paycheck, and now they approach this day Friday after moving from paycheck to no check" Democratic representative Elijah Cummings said in discussion on the House floor.

Head of the US Secret Service, who is responsible for protecting Trump, warned employees that financial stress can lead to depression and anxiety. "Watch out for warning signs of problems," writes Director R. D. "Tex". Everyone wrote in a note seen by Reuters.

HOUSE APPROVES REFUND

The house also consisted of a bill by a two-part vote of 411-7 that would give back pay to federal workers when the closure ended. The legislation already adopted by the Senate now leads to Trump's desk to be signed in law.

Separately, Senator Rob Portman and eight other Republican senators introduced legislation that would permanently ban the closure of government operations during budget matches, underlines the growing frustration in Washington.

During his presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly promised that Mexico would pay for the wall, which he says is necessary to curb the flow of illegal immigrants and drugs. But the Mexican government has refused, and Trump now calls for Congress to deliver $ 5.7 billion. Dollars in US taxpayers' funding for the wall.

Democrats in Congress call the wall an inefficient, outdated response to a complex problem.

Without a Capitol Hill compromise in sight, Trump publicly rumored on Thursday during the Texas trip to declare an emergency.

A close trump confidential sentenced time for such a move had come. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said in a statement, "It's time for President Trump to use emergency forces to fund the construction of a border wall / barrier. I hope it works."

Critics of the national emergency strategy have said it might be illegal. In any case, it was almost safe to trigger an immediate challenge from the Democrats, including an attempt to circumvent the power of Congress over national money strings.

An emergency declaration would entail risks. Even some of Trump's other Republicans in Congress have signaled concerns about such action. Given that the Constitution allows Congress to set spending priorities and appropriate money, they are concerned about a tough legal battle and an unwise precedent.

"I don't think he should do that. It's a bad precedent," Republican Senator Chuck Grassley told CNBC. "It seems to me that

An emergency declaration, however, would allow the government to fully reopen while the judges weigh the case, which may take months.

Before the interruption began, Trump said he would be" proud " to close the government over the issue of border security and would not blame the Democrats even if he later did it.

(Further reporting by Susan Heavey and Andy Sullivan; Writing by Andy Sullivan; Editing by Peter Cooney and Bill Trott) [19659046] More from Aol.com :

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