Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Business https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ The Maryland unemployment case adjourned until Monday

The Maryland unemployment case adjourned until Monday



A Baltimore judge has adjourned a scheduled hearing of the lawsuit against Maryland’s governor over unemployment benefits. A full hearing, originally scheduled for 6 p.m. 14 Friday, was postponed to Monday at. The lawsuits were filed in an attempt to block Government Larry Hogan’s early cessation of improved unemployment benefits. The governor announced last month that Maryland will discontinue the benefits and reintroduce job search requirements from July 3rd. But on July 3, Judge Lawrence Fletcher-Hill of the Baltimore City Circuit Court granted a 10-day temporary restraining order that stopped the state from stopping the benefits. Maryland Court of Appeals decision on unemployment case Daysi Serpa has an interest in the outcome of the trial. The benefits are the only income the fired hotel worker has until her employer calls her back to work. “I have family, you know, to take care of me ̵

1; a boy and a girl and another nephew that I have to take care of,” Serpa said. as a lifeline for Serpa, and hundreds of thousands of people still hampered by the economic hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, including gig workers and “What we are looking for in this lawsuit is that people just get their benefits through the federal program until Sept. 6 to give them some time to be recalled to work or find another job, “said Roxie Herbekian, president of Unite. Here Local 7th House Democratic Caucus joined the chorus, and In addition, Democrats sent a letter to the governor calling for the immediate removal of Maryland Labor Secretary Tiffany Robinson. that they will explain to the judge the governor and the actions of the Secretary of State are contrary to the law of the state. “We intended the money to continue as long as the federal government provided it,” said State Senator Jim Rosapepe, D District 21, whose district includes parts of Anne Arundel and Prince George’s counties. The governor’s press office issued a statement Friday calling the Democrats’ letter “a political stunt that tastes of total desperation. What exactly is their plan to help small businesses and mom-and-pop stores struggling to find workers right now?” “They do not have one. Just a lot of nonsense.” The governor said ending the federal benefits will help motivate people to get back to work. are not returning to work and it’s paralyzing businesses across the state, “Hogan said Wednesday. According to a June survey by the non-partisan Maryland Center on Economic Policy, 94% of unemployed Marylanders said they would go back to work. “Forty-seven percent report having trouble paying for household expenses, 20 % often do not have enough to eat, 11% are behind on rent or mortgage, “said Kali Schumitz with the Maryland Center for Economic Policy. The same survey finds that many people have not returned to work because 17% care for children or aging parents, 16% have a disability or illness, 6% mention concern about catching COVID-19, 5% care for a person with COVID-19 and 1% don do not have transport.

A Baltimore judge has adjourned a scheduled hearing to a lawsuit against Maryland’s governor over unemployment benefits.

A full hearing originally scheduled at 14 Friday, was postponed to Monday at. 9.30

Pressure is mounting for the governor to cease his opposition to the enhanced federal benefits.

The lawsuits were filed in an attempt to block Government Larry Hogan’s early cessation of improved unemployment benefits. The governor announced last month that Maryland will discontinue the benefits and reintroduce job search requirements from July 3rd.

But on July 3, Judge Lawrence Fletcher-Hill in Baltimore City Circuit Court granted a 10-day temporary detention order that stopped the state from stopping the benefits.

On Monday, the appellate court dismissed the governor’s appeal of the temporary detention order and sent the case back to the lower court.

Daysi Serpa has an interest in the outcome of the trial. The benefits are the only income the fired hotel worker has until her employer calls her back to work.

“I have family, you know, to take care of me – a boy and a girl and another nephew that I have to take care of,” said Serpa.

Advocates for the unemployed said they would argue that the federal benefits serve as a lifeline for Serpa, and hundreds of thousands of people still under the economic hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, including gig workers and self-employed.

“What we’re looking for in this lawsuit is that people just get their benefits through the federal program until Sept. 6 to give them some time to be recalled to work or find another job,” said Roxie Herbekian, president of Unite Here Local 7.

The House Democratic Caucus joined the chorus, and in addition, Democrats sent a letter to the governor calling for the immediate removal of Maryland Labor Secretary Tiffany Robinson.

“Because she’s failed miserably throughout this crisis,” said Montgomery County delegate Lorig Charkoudian, D District 20.

Advocates for the unemployed said they will explain to the judge the governor and the actions of the secretary of state are contrary to state law.

“We intended the money to continue as long as the federal government provided it,” said State Senator Jim Rosapepe, D District 21, whose district includes parts of Anne Arundel and Prince George’s counties.

The governor’s press office on Friday issued a statement calling the Democrats’ letter “a political stunt that tastes of total desperation. What exactly is their plan to help small businesses and mom-and-pop stores struggling to find workers equal” now? They do not have one. Just a lot of rubbish. “

The governor said ending the federal benefits will help motivate people to get back to work.

“The biggest problem we have is a shortage of workers. People are not returning to work and it’s crippling businesses all over the state,” Hogan said Wednesday.

According to a June survey by the non-partisan Maryland Center on Economic Policy, 94% of unemployed Marylanders said they would go back to work.

“Forty-seven percent report that they have trouble paying for household expenses, 20% often do not have enough to eat, 11% are behind on rent or mortgage,” Kali Schumitz told the Maryland Center for Economic Policy.

The same survey shows that many people have not returned to work because 17% care for children or aging parents, 16% have a disability or illness, 6% mention concern about catching COVID-19, 5% care for a person with COVID -19 and 1% do not have transport.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may find the same content in a different format, or you may find more information on their site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may find the same content in a different format, or you may find more information on their site.




Source link