Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ San Francisco’s top health official comments on when COVID-19 restrictions will be lifted

San Francisco’s top health official comments on when COVID-19 restrictions will be lifted



That is the question in all of San Francisco’s minds: When will COVID-19 restrictions be eased?

The city’s health director was asked this question at a press briefing on Tuesday, and while Dr. Grant Colfax provided a vague answer, he suggested that from home the order could continue for several weeks.

“Our numbers are still rising and it usually takes a couple of weeks for these numbers to start going down once they have leveled off,” Colfax said. “Right now we’re under the state shelter-on-site order. I expect we’ll continue to be there at least by the end of this month. And really we’ll have to watch the numbers to see whether cases and hospitalization rates begin to decline, and then we will have a much better sense of when we will gradually be able to open. “

California Gavin Newsom introduced the regional residence order in early December to prevent local health systems from collapsing under the weight of soaring COVID-1

9 case burdens.


It divides the state into five broad regions – SF is part of the larger Bay Area region – and limits them with intensive care units’ bed capacity below 15%. The order requires most companies, except for key services and retail, to close operations. Residents of regions under the order are asked to stay home except for work, shopping or other important activities, such as going to the doctor’s office.

A county may choose to be more restrictive than the state’s regional home order, and San Francisco was among several Bay Area counties that previously adopted the order on Dec. 3 before ICU capacity fell below 15%.

ICU capacity is now well below the threshold, and government data shows that the Bay Area region is at 4.7% per capita. Tuesday.

Health officials are not considering revoking Bay Area’s order until the region’s four-week ICU projection shows a capacity of more than or equal to 15%, according to the California Department of Public Health.

A woman running in Golden Gate Park runs past signs reminding people of social distance and wearing masks in San Francisco on July 28, 2020.

A woman running in Golden Gate Park runs past signs reminding people of social distance and wearing masks in San Francisco on July 28, 2020.

Douglas Zimmerman / SFGATE

Colfax opened Tuesday’s press briefing with an update on the state of the city’s pandemic.

“What we are seeing right now is a holiday increase on top of an even bigger Thanksgiving wave. We are in a dynamic situation where things are rising in a holiday increase after December over an already record-breaking wave after Thanksgiving. Post-Thanksgiving we saw an increase 70% in the cases in the weeks after that holiday. Now we have seen an increase of about 28% in our increase after the holiday. “

Colfax said the city is averaging about 280 new cases a day, about the same case rate after Thanksgiving.

As cases increase, admissions increase, and as of Tuesday, there were 249 COVID-19 patients admitted to SF, compared with 114 at the height of summer increases in July, Colfax said.

“We have to work to flatten this curve,” Colfax said. “We have to turn this around.”

Colfax said vaccines are an important tool to curb the virus, and the city wants to expand the vaccine administration infrastructure and will open locations around the city as vaccine supplies increase. The city has been focused on vaccinating health care professionals and residents at qualified nursing facilities, and this week the San Francisco Health Network begins vaccinating people 65 and older at its 14 primary care providers, including Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital Laguna Honda Hospital. More than 14,000 people aged 65 or older are served by the San Francisco Health Network. The network provides health care regardless of immigration status or lack of insurance.

Colfax noted that 95% of the San Francisco population has health insurance – mostly through Kaiser, Sutter Health and UCSF – and these residents should look to their providers for vaccine information.


Source link