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Rabbi says gun & # 39; miraculously attached & # 39; in the synagogue attack




  Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein "title =" Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein "/> </source></source></source></source></picture></div><figcaption>
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                  Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein speaks at a press conference in the Chabad of Poway synagogue on April 28, 2019 in Poway, California, one day after being wounded. Denis Poroy / AP Photo </p>
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California

Updated

POWAY, California – In minutes, after the savage man fled the play that killed a woman in a Southern California synagogue, a wounded rabbi Yisroel Goldstein wrapped her bloodied hand in a prayer shawl and approached the panic congregation, wowing to be strong in the face of yet another deadly attack in a worship house.

"We are a Jewish nation that will stand high. We won't let anyone down. Terrorism like this will not take us down, "Goldstein recalled telling his congregations after the shot erupting Saturday in Chabad of Poway.

Narrative continued under

Congregant Lori Kaye, 60, was killed in the slider, who wounded Goldstein, 8-year-old Noya Dahan and his 34-year-old uncle Almog Peretz, said the authorities. Hours after the three wounded were released from hospitals, Goldstein described the trial at a press conference Sunday outside the synagogue north of San Diego.

Goldstein said that he was preparing for a service on Easter's last day and saw a young man wearing sunglasses standing in front of him with a rifle.

"I could not see his eyes. I couldn't see his soul, "Goldstein said. He raised his hands to protect himself and lost one of his fingers in the shooting.

And then Goldstein says," Miraculously, the gun was fixed. "

The attack on Saturday came exactly six months after a mass shooter in a view in Pittsburgh.

John T. Earnest, 19, surrendered to the police after bursting into the synagogue north of San Diego and opening fire like about 100 people worshiped inside.

Service that had no prior law enforcement contact may be subject to hate crime beyond murder as he is arrested later in This week, San Diego County said Sheriff William Gore, who was held without bail, and it was unclear if he had a lawyer. The police sought Earnest's house and said he was also investigated for a fire attack on a mosque near Escondido in California on March 24.

The 8-year-old victim said she had just finished praying and was ready to play with other children when shots hit. Her uncle rushed her and the other children outside, the girl said.

Her legs were bleeding, but the doctors told her she didn't need surgery, she said.

"I was really really scared," she said. "I didn't see my father. I thought he was dead."

Her father, 32-year-old Israel Dahan, said he turned around a folding table as soon as he saw the man go in with a long rifle . Then he hurried to get two of his other children safe.

There were signs that an AR-type assault weapon could have malfunctioned after gunman fired several rounds, Gore said. An off-duty border patrol who worked as a security guard fired on the shooting game when he fled, missed him, but hit his escape car, the sheriff said.

Shortly after flying, Earnest called 911 to report the shooting, San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit said. When an officer reached him on a lane, "the suspect went over, jumped out of his car with his hands up and was immediately imprisoned," he said.

Goldstein described Kaye as a "pioneer, founder" of the congregation and said he was "heartbreaking" at her death.

"Lori took the ball for all of him," said the rabbi. "She didn't deserve to die."

He said Kaye's doctor man was called to have a wounded worship and fainted when he realized that it was his wife.

When the shot erupted, another worshiper Shimon Abitbul said he immediately placed his 2-year-old grandson on the floor and waited for a break in the shooting to grab the boy and sprint away.

Then Abitbul ran back to the shooting area to try to help a woman he described as having a hole in his chest and who later died, he said Sunday, tears flowing down his face.

Abitbul, who visited from Israel and lived with his daughter and family in Southern California, said he was still catching up with the carnage.

"We are all human," he said. "It doesn't matter whether you are Jews or Christians or Muslims."

Peretz, injured in the leg, visited from Israel, lived with a family who had moved to California a few months ago from the Israeli town of Sderot near the Gaza border, a frequent target of rocket attacks by Hamas militant group . He said a man entered the synagogue and began shooting in all directions.

"I was with my back to the shooter. I heard a shot or two and then turned to meet him, and that was when he fired on me. I ran fast and took a little girl in my hands," he is the Israeli news site. "He hit me once in the leg and I ran running. I didn't feel much as there were so many balls flying by. I heard them and I saw them right next to me."

Gore said the authorities reviewed Earnest's social media, including what he described as a "manifesto".

A person who identifies himself as John Earnest published an anti-Jewish screed online about an hour before the attack. The poster described himself as a nurse student and praised the suspects accused of performing lethal attacks on mosques in New Zealand last month, killing 50 and in Pittsburgh's synagogue Tree of Life on October 27, where 11 people were killed. [19659009] It was a hate crime undoubtedly, said National Security Adviser John Bolton on "Fox News Sunday." He said investigators have not seen any connection between the suspects and other extremist groups.

California State University, San Marcos, confirmed that Earnest was a dean's list student and said the school was "horrified and discouraged" that he was suspected of "this despicable act".

Several dozen people, many wearing black, gathered at a corner in Poway on Sunday to show their support for the victims and the synagogue's congregation and call for an end to hatred and violence.

They brought signs that read "no more killings" and "Shalom". Drivers sad when they passed. A young boy sat with a cardboard sign reading "We must do better".

Deb Lira, 71, from San Diego, said she was angry and sick of the attack in what has long been a peaceful community. "I'm here because I'm Jewish and that's my message," she said, pointing to a sign that read "never again" and "never forget."

"I won't be silent," she said.

There was no known threat after Earnest was arrested, but the authorities increased patrols in places of worship on Saturday and again on Sunday as a security measure, police said.


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