Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Melania Trump donates $ 945 white dress to the White House event to raise awareness of sickle cell anemia

Melania Trump donates $ 945 white dress to the White House event to raise awareness of sickle cell anemia



First Lady Melania Trump wowed in white while hosting a socially distant roundtable discussion to raise awareness of sickle cell disease (SCD) on Monday.

The White House itself was held in the state dining hall just weeks after President Donald Trump formally recognized September as the month of raising awareness about sickle cell anemia.

Melania cut a stylish figure in a $ 945 midi dress with white belt from Max Mara, and she added a splash of color to her sleek look with her soaring orange stilettos.

First Lady assignments: Melania Trump, 50, hosted a roundtable discussion to raise awareness of sickle cell disease (SCD) on Monday

First Lady assignments: Melania Trump, 50, hosted a roundtable discussion to raise awareness of sickle cell disease (SCD) on Monday

Today's outfit: Melania cut a stylish figure in a $ 945 white midi dress with belt from Max Mara and added a splash of color to her sleek look with her soaring orange stilettos

Today's outfit: Melania cut a stylish figure in a $ 945 white midi dress with belt from Max Mara and added a tint to her sleek look with her soaring orange stilettos

Today’s outfit: Melania cut a stylish figure in a $ 945 white midi dress with belt from Max Mara and added a splash of color to her sleek look with her soaring orange stilettos

Style: Melania's highlighted brown hair was loosely styled around the shoulders, and she stuck with her distinctive makeup: dark, smoky eye shadow and a pink lip

Style: Melania’s highlighted brown hair was styled loosely around her shoulders, and she stuck with her distinctive makeup: dark, smoky eye shadow and a pink lip

The previous model’s perfectly tailored gown dress was made in Italy from stretch wool, fully lined and cut with a single vent in the back.

The sold-out design comes with a detachable woven belt that matches the braided trimmer of the dress that she chose to wear.

Melania has preferred a minimalist look over the years, and Monday’s look was no exception. She let her shoes and dress do the talking by keeping her jewelry to a minimum.

The first lady wore nothing but two glittering platinum and diamond ribbons – one on each of her hands.

Her highlighted brown hair was styled loosely around her shoulders, and she stuck to her distinctive makeup: dark, smoky eye shadow and a pink lip.

Ready to go: The first lady had a bright smile on her face as she entered the State White House dining room prior to the discussion

Ready to go: The first lady had a bright smile on her face as she entered the State White House dining room prior to the discussion

Happy: Melania spoke with SCD patients, researchers and medical professionals at the event

Happy: Melania spoke with SCD patients, researchers and medical professionals at the event

Participants: Melania, who was not wearing a mask, sat between a young patient named Samuel Price and Ashley Valentine, co-founder and president of Sick Cells

Participants: Melania, who was not wearing a mask, sat between a young patient named Samuel Price and Ashley Valentine, co-founder and president of Sick Cells

Participants: Melania, who was not wearing a mask, sat between a young patient named Samuel Price and Ashley Valentine, co-founder and president of Sick Cells

Risky?  While there were sickle cell patients of different ages, including children, only a few people sitting at the table wore a mask

Risky? While there were sickle cell patients of different ages, including children, only a few people sitting at the table wore a mask

Melania had a bright smile on her face as she entered the state dining room prior to the discussion with patients, researchers and medical professionals.

And while there were sickle cell patients of various ages, including children, only a few people sitting at the table wore a mask.

Having sickle cell disease increases a person’s risk of severe COVID-19 disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Melania, who was not wearing a mask, sat between a young patient named Samuel Price and Ashley Valentine, co-founder and president of Sick Cells, raising awareness about SCD.

Valentine was one of the few participants photographed wearing a mask, although she briefly removed it while speaking.

Just in time: The event came just weeks after President Donald Trump formally recognized September as the month for raising awareness about sickle cell anemia

Just in time: The event came just weeks after President Donald Trump formally recognized September as the month for raising awareness about sickle cell anemia

Chronic condition: Sickle cell disease is the umbrella term for a group of hereditary conditions that seriously affect red blood cells.

Chronic condition: Sickle cell disease is the umbrella term for a group of hereditary conditions that seriously affect red blood cells.

All ears: Melania listened intently as patient sickle cell disease Samuel Price spoke

All ears: Melania listened intently as patient sickle cell disease Samuel Price spoke

Protected: Ashley Valentine was one of the few participants photographed wearing a mask, although she briefly removed it while speaking

Protected: Ashley Valentine was one of the few participants photographed wearing a mask, although she briefly removed it while speaking

Sickle cell disease is the umbrella term for a group of hereditary conditions that severely affect red blood cells.

Healthy red blood cells – produced by bone marrow stem cells – are biconcave slices that can be easily bent and flexed. However, defective stem cells in those with sickle cell disease produce crescent-shaped red blood cells.

They are stiff, unable to push through smaller blood vessels and tend to cause blockages that deprive parts of the body of oxygen.

Sufferers are not expected to live longer than 60 years, and treatment focuses primarily on relieving symptoms, such as pain and infections, through blood transfusions and painkillers.

The disease affects about 100,000 people in the United States and affects disproportionately African and Hispanic Americans to a greater extent.

In 2018, President Trump signed the Seal Cell Anemia and Other Hereditary Blood Problems Act, research, monitoring, prevention and treatment, a prevention and treatment program that approves research initiatives.

This year, on August 31, he formally recognized September as Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Month.


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