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Live: Coronavirus Daily News Updates, September 16: What to Know Today About COVID-19 in the Seattle Area, Washington State and the World



While some officials around the United States are beginning to loosen virus-related restrictions, public health experts warn that the United States may see more new coronavirus outbreaks as a result.

In addition, researchers find that the effects of the deadly virus on younger patients reflect patterns they see in adults – especially that COVID-19 kills Latin American, black and American Indian children in much higher numbers than their white peers.

During Wednesday, we will publish on this page updates on the pandemic and its effects on the Seattle area, the Northwest Pacific and the world. Updates from Tuesday are here and all of our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

Madrid, Europe’s hotspot for pandemics, monitors targeted lockdowns

The Spanish capital will introduce selective lockdowns in urban areas where coronavirus spreads faster, regional health authorities announced on Wednesday.

The measures in Madrid, which have accounted for almost a third of the country’s new cases, may include restrictions on mobility and are likely to affect southern working-class neighborhoods where the number of viral contaminants has been steadily rising since August, Deputy Regional Health Chief Antonio Zapatero said during a news conference.

Workers in a nursing home
Workers at a nursing home “DomusVi Arturo Soria” hold a minute of silence in support of the social and health sector and its staff in Madrid, Spain, on Tuesday. (Manu Fernandez / Associated Press)

Zapatero also said people have relaxed protective measures by holding large gatherings, often overlooking social distances or masks. He announced that the police will monitor compliance with mandatory self-isolation. At least 90 people have been shown to skip quarantines after testing positive for the new virus, the regional government said.

With a coronavirus case load of over 600,000 and more than 30,000 confirmed deaths for the new virus, Spain has been the hardest hit European country in what some experts describe as the second wave of the pandemic.

Read the story here.

—The Associated Press

Examination tips antibody drug can cut COVID-19 admissions

A drug company says partial results from a study testing an antibody drug suggest it may help keep mild to moderately ill COVID-19 patients from needing to be hospitalized, a goal that no current coronavirus drug has. has been able to achieve.

Eli Lilly announced the findings Wednesday in a press release, but they have not been published or reviewed by independent researchers.

The drug lacked the main goal of the study to reduce the amount of virus patients who had had after 11 days, except in the middle of the three doses tested. However, most study participants, even those receiving placebo treatment, had cleared the virus by that time, so the time now seems too late to assess the potential benefit, the company said.

Other tests suggest the drug reduced viruses more quickly, and the results are an encouraging “proof of principle,” as this and other studies continue, Lilly said.

Read the story here.

—The Associated Press

UK to ration COVID-19 test as disease increases

UK government ministers said on Wednesday that they planned to ration coronavirus tests, prioritizing health care workers and nursing home staff after widespread reports that people around the country were unable to schedule tests.

UK lawmakers criticized the government’s handling of the COVID-19 test crisis another day Wednesday, when opposition leaders said Prime Minister Boris Johnson lacked a coherent plan to tackle the virus as the country faces another wave of the pandemic.

Workers prepare to open coronavirus testing center in Southwark, south London, on Wednesday 16 September 2020. The UK government plans to ration coronavirus testing, prioritizing health care workers and nursing home staff following widespread reports that people across the country were out able to schedule tests.  On Wednesday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson will face questions about his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in the House of Commons and a key committee amid the outcry over the lack of testing.  (Dominic Lipinski / PA via AP)
Workers prepare to open coronavirus testing center in Southwark, south London, on Wednesday 16 September 2020. The UK government plans to ration coronavirus testing, prioritizing health workers and nursing home staff following widespread reports that people across the country were out able to schedule tests. On Wednesday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson will face questions about his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in the House of Commons and a key committee amid the outcry over the lack of testing. (Dominic Lipinski / PA via AP)

The pressure on tests comes amid a rise in COVID-19 cases across the UK, which have pushed daily new infections to levels not seen since the end of May, forcing the Conservative government to impose public borders gatherings.

Widespread testing is seen as crucial in controlling the spread of the virus because it allows those who are infected to isolate themselves while helping health officials identify hot spots and track down those who are infected.

Read the story here.

—The Associated Press

Hurricane hunting in 2020 is evolving with new technology in the light of COVID-19 safety issues

A satellite image taken Tuesday shows Hurricane Sally moving slowly toward the United States from the Gulf of Mexico.  (NOAA via AP)
A satellite image taken Tuesday shows Hurricane Sally moving slowly toward the United States from the Gulf of Mexico. (NOAA via AP)

ORLANDO, Fla. – When the hurricane fighter jet collected data for Hurricane Laura in August, most meteorologists analyzing it were not on board. This is something new for 2020. They are now working thousands of miles away in their own homes and interpreting the data thanks to new software developed out of necessity in a COVID-19 world.

Read the full story here.

—Joe Mario Pedersen / Orlando Sentinel

Trump denies downplaying viruses, doubts the use of the mask

President Donald Trump speaks with ABC News anchor George Stephanopoulos before a town hall at the National Constitution Center, Tuesday in Philadelphia.  (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks with ABC News anchor George Stephanopoulos before a town hall at the National Constitution Center, Tuesday in Philadelphia. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

PHILADELPHIA – Convincing persuasive questions about voters’ real problems, President Donald Trump denied during a TV City Hall that he had downplayed the threat of coronavirus earlier this year, although there is an audio recording of him doing just that.

Trump, in what could well be a preview of his appearance in the presidential debates less than two weeks away, questioned the widely accepted scientific conclusions of his own administration, which strongly encouraged the use of face clothing and seemed to reject the proposal for , nation has racial inequalities.

Read the full story here.

—Kevin Freking and Zeke Miller / The Associated Press

How risky is it to go to the gym?

—Kris Higginson

The United States outlines a comprehensive plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

Research assistant Kai Hu transfers medium to cells in the laboratory at Imperial College London.  Imperial College is working on developing a COVID-19 vaccine.  (AP Photo / Kirsty Wigglesworth file)
Research assistant Kai Hu transfers medium to cells in the laboratory at Imperial College London. Imperial College is working on developing a COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo / Kirsty Wigglesworth file)

Vaccines would be free for all Americans under a sweeping plan outlined by the federal government today. Here’s how the feds say it will work.

—Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar / Associated Press

Catch up the last 24 hours

Matt Helms, far left, chats with Zach Preston and his wife Allie Preston at The Leon Pub in Tallahassee, Fla., Monday night, September 14, 2020. They have been stuck by the once popular waterhole, which is trying to revive its business in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.  (Bobby Caina Calvan / The Associated Press)
Matt Helms, far left, chats with Zach Preston and his wife Allie Preston at The Leon Pub in Tallahassee, Fla., Monday night, September 14, 2020. They have been stuck by the once popular waterhole, which is trying to revive its business in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. (Bobby Caina Calvan / Associated Press)

The United States is setting itself up again for failure while officials are withdrawing rules on social distancing while the case is still high, public health experts warn. Track the pandemic in Washington.

COVID-19 kills far more Spanish and black children than white youth, according to a new federal record of deaths in children. “What it should mean for people is that steps like wearing a mask are not just about protecting your family and yourself,” says a specialist in infectious diseases. “It’s about racial justice.”

Wedding guests pay a steep price after a reception, Maine’s virus guidelines broke. At least seven people have died and more than 175 cases of coronavirus spanning a hundred miles have been linked to the August incident.

—Kris Higginson

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