Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ US https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ How Sacramento County Firefighters Prepare for Fire Season

How Sacramento County Firefighters Prepare for Fire Season



The fire season is already underway in California, as crews battled several small fires the first week of May, resulting in strong winds and unusually dry conditions that triggered a red flag warning. KCRA 3 News came behind the scenes to look at how the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District is preparing to protect not only the county, but the entire Sacramento region. “One of the biggest things we can provide is not just accurate information, but actually provides it. “Time,” said Metro Fire Pilot Bryce Mitchell, who was standing outside the air operations hangar at McClellan Airport. Metro Fire̵

7;s Air Operations division has two Bell UH1 model Huey helicopters ready to handle firefighting, rescue and EMS. The kind of benefit you get from having a plane has the point of view you do not see from the ground, “Mitchell said. Mitchell said an aerial photo can help ground crews navigate dangerous conditions and locate people who need help. What may take a crew on the ground 15 to 20 minutes to access an area only to find out that they may have missed additional threats or gone the wrong way could be made much easier – and faster – by plane Metro Fire is not only aimed at helping the region from the air, but also from the ground up. Kevin Coleman is a bulldozer operations and program manager with the fire district who has two bulldozers ready for the fire season. types of machines for fire. “I can do the work in this machine with 15 guys within a tenth of the time frame,” Coleman said. Coleman can get to places and clear hazardous fuels in a way that crews on the ground do not able to. He said he is also less vulnerable to injury and can work faster and more efficiently than land herds. These tools are just some of the resources available to protect not only the county but the entire region during what is expected to be a dangerous fire season.

The fire season is already underway in California, as crews battled several small fires the first week of May, resulting in strong winds and unusually dry conditions that triggered a red flag warning.

KCRA 3 News got behind the scenes to see how the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District is preparing to protect not only the county, but the entire Sacramento region.

“One of the biggest things we can provide is not only accurate information, but providing it in real time,” said Metro Fire Pilot Bryce Mitchell, who was standing outside the air operations hangar at McClellan Airport.

Metro Fire’s Air Operations division has two Bell UH1 model Huey helicopters ready to handle firefighting, rescue and EMS.

“The kind of benefit you get from having a plane is having the point of view you don’t see from the ground,” Mitchell said.

Mitchell said an aerial photo could help land crews navigate dangerous conditions and find people in need of help. What may take a crew on the ground 15 to 20 minutes to access an area only to find out that they may have missed additional threats or gone the wrong way could be made much easier – and faster – by plane .

Metro Fire is not only aimed at helping the region from the air, but also from the ground. Kevin Coleman is a bulldozer operation and program manager in the fire district, which has two bulldozers ready for the fire season.

Inside Dozer One, Coleman talks about the benefits of bringing these types of machines on fire.

“I can do the work in this machine with 15 guys within a tenth of the time frame,” Coleman said.

Coleman can get to places and clear hazardous fuels in a way that crews on the ground cannot. He said he is also less vulnerable to injury and can work faster and more efficiently than land herds.

These tools are just some of the resources available to protect not only the county but the entire region during what is expected to be a dangerous fire season.


Source link