Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Gov. Mills announces updates to the state’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan

Gov. Mills announces updates to the state’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan



Gov. Janet Mills on Wednesday announced changes to Maine’s plan to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses across the state. with those 70 and older; additional emergency response personnel and people supporting infrastructure critical to Maine’s COVID-19 response. The governor said the updated strategy also focuses on adults of all ages with high-risk medical conditions that put them at greater risk of serious illness or death from COVID-19.Mills said the changes are aimed at preventing serious illness and save the lives of the Maine people. She added that new recommendations announced Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services appear to be in line with Maine̵

7;s vaccine strategy. “As we distribute the vaccine and adapt our strategy to meet Maine’s needs, my basic goal is to save lives. Maine is predominantly an older state and we have a large number of people with high-risk medical conditions. These people are exactly who face the greatest risks of the virus, ”Mills said in a statement. “Given that they are at greater risk of serious illness or death, it is appropriate to first target the limited supply of vaccine that Maine receives to this population.” Maine is currently in Phase 1A of its vaccine distribution plan, which has so far focused on health. care workers, EMTs and residents in long-term care facilities. The state on Wednesday said it is adding other emergency responders, public safety personnel and critical COVID-19 response personnel to Phase 1A. Those now added to Phase 1A may begin receiving vaccines this week, Mills said. The state plans to complete Phase 1A in February. Phase 1B will focus on vaccination of older Mainers beginning with those 70 and older. Mills said that approx. 193,000 Maine people are 70 years of age or older. Some have already qualified for vaccinations as part of Phase 1A because they live in long-term care facilities. Also included in Phase 1B are people at high risk medical conditions. Moller said Phase 1B will continue to include frontline workers, as recommended by the federal government. The governor said the state aims to implement Phase 1B in April. Phase 1C will include other critical workers, while Phase 2 will include people aged 16 to 64 who are not otherwise eligible in an earlier phase. These phases are planned for this spring and summer. Moller said the federal government buys vaccines and distributes them with just one week’s notice. She said the supply is limited, unpredictable and inconsistent. The governor said to date, Maine has only received enough doses to vaccinate 7% of residents against COVID-19. She added that Maine’s award for next week, 17-23. January, is 18,550, which is less than what Maine received the week of December 28th.

Gov. Janet Mills on Wednesday announced changes to Maine’s plan to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses across the state.

Mills said the state, after consulting the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will allocate the limited vaccine supply to older Mainers, beginning with those 70 and older; additional emergency personnel and people supporting infrastructure critical to Maine’s COVID-19 response.

The governor said the updated strategy also focuses on adults of all ages with high-risk medical conditions that put them at greater risk for serious illness or death from COVID-19.

Mills said the changes are aimed at preventing serious illness and saving the lives of Maine people. She added that new recommendations announced Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services appear to be in line with Maine’s vaccine strategy.

“As we distribute the vaccine and adapt our strategy to Maine’s needs, my fundamental goal is to save lives. Maine is predominantly an older state and we have a large number of people with high-risk medical conditions. These people are exactly who face the greatest risks of the virus, ”Mills said in a statement. “Given that they are at greater risk of serious illness or death, it is appropriate to first target the limited supply of vaccine that Maine receives to this population.”

Maine is currently in Phase 1A of its vaccine distribution plan, which so far has focused on healthcare professionals, EMTs and residents in long-term care facilities.

The state on Wednesday said it is adding other emergency responders, public safety personnel and critical COVID-19 response personnel to Phase 1A.

Those now added to Phase 1A may begin receiving vaccines this week, Mills said. The state plans to complete Phase 1A in February.

Phase 1B will focus on vaccination of elderly Mainers beginning with those 70 years of age and older. Mills said that approx. 193,000 Maine people are 70 years of age or older. Some have already qualified for vaccinations as part of Phase 1A because they live in long-term care.

Also included in Phase 1B are people with high-risk medical conditions.

Mills said Phase 1B continues to include frontline workers, as recommended by the federal government.

The governor said the state aims to complete Phase 1B by April.

Phase 1C will include other critical staff, while Phase 2 will include people aged 16 to 64 who are not otherwise qualified in a previous phase. These phases are planned for this spring and summer.

Mills said the federal government buys vaccines and distributes them with just one week’s notice. She said the supply is limited, unpredictable and inconsistent.

The governor said to date, Maine has only received enough doses to vaccinate 7% of residents against COVID-19. She added that Maine’s award for next week, 17-23. January, is 18,550, which is less than what Maine received the week of December 28th.


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