Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ US https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Florida state legislature has redirected 40% of tenants’ association funds in general fund since 2008: report

Florida state legislature has redirected 40% of tenants’ association funds in general fund since 2008: report



The year before a 12-story building collapsed in South Florida, killing at least 79 people and leaving 61 unaccounted for, the state charged $ 13.7 million in fees from owner-occupied housing associations, timeshares and mobile home parks, but swept $ 5 million into it. the state’s general fund, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reported.

These funds, which are collected at the beginning of each year, are supposed to go to the training of board members and review of complaints, but the state has made it a habit to abolish the funds.

Since 2008, the state has diverted $ 65 million of the $ 167 million that has been taxed, nearly 40%, to the general fund, according to the Daytona Beach News-Journal.

“For years we̵

7;ve been saying, please do not sweep that fund,” Travis Moore, a lobbyist representing Florida tenant-owner associations through the Community Associations Institutes, told the local newspaper. “But every year the legislature redistributes that money.”

SISTERS IN FLORIDA CONDO COLLAPSE EXCAVED IN THE SAME CHEST

The conversion of money to the state general fund contributes to the growing fear that many warning signs of structural problems at Champlain Towers South may have been ignored before the building crashed in the middle of the night on June 24th.

Search and rescue personnel are removing debris on a stretcher as they work on top of the rubble at the Champlain Towers South apartment building, where many people are still missing more than a week after it partially collapsed, Friday 2.  July 2021 in Surfside, Fla.  (AP Photo / Mark Humphrey)

Search and rescue personnel are removing debris on a stretcher as they work on top of the rubble at the Champlain Towers South apartment building, where many people are still missing more than a week after it partially collapsed, Friday 2. July 2021 in Surfside, Fla. (AP Photo / Mark Humphrey)

Jean Wodnicki, president of the building’s owners’ association, warned residents just two months before the structure collapsed that more than $ 15 million in repairs were needed.

“Much of this work could have been done or planned for many years,” Wodnicki wrote in the April 9 letter, originally reported by the Wall Street Journal. “But this is where we are now.”

A 2018 report from Morabito Consultants said improperly laid waterproofing prevented water from running out from under the building’s pool deck.

“The failed waterproofing is causing major structural damage to the concrete slab under these areas,” the report said. “Failure to replace the waterproofing in the near future will cause the extent of the concrete deterioration to expand exponentially.”

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As investigators try to understand why this building collapsed and whether other buildings in Florida are unsafe, on-site search teams have switched to a recovery effort after saying Wednesday that there is “no chance of life” more than two weeks after the collapse.

Rescue teams are still working on 12-hour shifts, 24 hours a day to find the 61 victims who are not being accounted for.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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