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Doctors recognize COVID-19 precautions for dramatic falls in flu cases



The messages about wearing masks, social distance and washing our hands prevent more than the spread of COVID-19. We are seeing a dramatic drop in the number of flu cases this season. Local health officials typically said this time of year about 600 people would be hospitalized with the flu each week in Ohio. Instead, we have only seen 50 throughout the flu season. flu numbers this season are staggering for all the right reasons. “This year we’ve seen a dramatic difference in what we typically see. Normally we start to see a lot of cases, but at UC Health, for example, we’ve had one,” says Dr. Carl Fichtenbaum, a UC Health Professor of Infectious Diseases. Doctors said January is usually when the flu season starts after holiday trips. but not this year. hospitalizations are flat. they recognize the same safety precautions needed to reduce the spread of COVID-1

9 “If you block transmission, you do not have the cases,” said Hamilton Co. Public Health Medical Director Dr. Steve Feagins. If the flu is not spreading, why is COVID-19? “COVID, on the other hand, is much closer to measles. So we see really efficient transmission, and it happens in both airborne and droplets,” Fichtenbaum said. The mild flu season is a welcome relief for an already stressed health system. Feagins said 30% of inpatients right now are COVID-positive. “Our hospitals are pretty crowded and full throughout the community. We do not need another epidemic locally that will tip the scales and make it harder for us to take care of people,” Fichtenbaum said. While the war on COVID-19 pays off, local health officials said they are grateful that the flu has so far not exacerbated an already overwhelming pandemic. “Good. Boy, if we did not do these things, just imagine what we would see,” Feagins said. While the number of flu cases is far down, a number has grown exponentially. It is the number of people who die with a combination of pneumonia and influenza. In Hamilton County, it is typically around 1-2%, while this year it is closer to 14%. Doctors said it was due to COVID-19-related pneumonia.

The messages about wearing masks, social distance and washing our hands prevent more than the spread of COVID-19.

We are seeing a dramatic drop in the number of flu cases this season.

Local health officials said that this time of year, typically about 600 people would be hospitalized with the flu each week in Ohio.

Instead, we have only seen 50 throughout the flu season.

The flu numbers this season are staggering for all the right reasons.

“This year we’ve seen a dramatic difference in what we typically see. Normally we start to see a lot of cases, but at UC Health, for example, we’ve had one,” said Dr. Carl Fichtenbaum, a UC Health Professor of Infectious Diseases.

Doctors said January is usually when the flu season starts after holiday trips.

But not this year.

Admissions are flat.

They recognize the same precautions to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

“If you block the transmission, you do not have the cases,” Hamilton Co. said. Public Health Medical Director Dr. Steve Feagins.

If the flu is not spreading, why is COVID-19?

“COVID, on the other hand, is much closer to measles. So we see really efficient transmission, and it happens both airborne and droplet transmission,” Fichtenbaum said.

The mild flu season is a welcome relief for an already stressed health system.

Feagins said 30% of inpatients right now are COVID-positive.

“Our hospitals are pretty crowded and full throughout the community. We do not need another epidemic locally that will tip the scale and make it harder for us to care for people,” Fichtenbaum said.

While the war on COVID-19 is paying off, local health officials said they are grateful that the flu so far is not exacerbating an already overwhelming pandemic.

“Greetings. Boy, if we did not do these things, just imagine what we would see,” Feagins said.

While the number of flu cases is far down, a number has grown exponentially.

It is the number of people who die with a combination of pneumonia and influenza.

In Hamilton County, it is typically around 1-2%, while this year it is closer to 14%.

Doctors said it was due to COVID-19-related pneumonia.


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