Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ 186 zoological guests were told to get rabies shot due to wild bats

186 zoological guests were told to get rabies shot due to wild bats



Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium said a wild bat found inside the zoo tested positive for rabies and urged 186 people attending zoological camping events to seek treatment for rabies exposure. The zoo noted that the bat was not part of its collection, rather a wild bat that entered the aquarium. According to the zoo, a guest who participated in an overnight campaign in the aquarium building reported on July 4 that she woke up and noticed a wild bat near her head. She appeared to have no scratches or bite marks. But because the bat flew away before it could be caught, the zoo’s veterinarian advised the woman to contact her doctor for the risk of rabies exposure. The zoo says it notified the Douglas County Health Department, and a team from the zoo, located seven wild, little brown bats inside the aquarium. Everyone was killed. Only one of the seven tested positive for rabies. According to the zoo, both the Nebraska State Veterinarian and the Nebraska Department of Health recommended 1

86 guests staying in the aquarium during the nights of July 2nd and 3rd as well as June 29th and 30th should receive rabies after exposure prophylaxis. Each participant has been notified, including children and adults as well as some zoo staff. The zoo offers guests a refund for the camping events and it pays for rabies treatment after exposure. Henry Doorly Zoo says overnight surveillance and other inspection efforts have found no bats in the complex and no evidence of prolonged bat roasting. Little brown bats are common in Nebraska, and it is not uncommon for a wild bat to become infected with rabies. The Nebraska Humane Society offers this advice on what to do if a bat is in your home.

Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium said a wild bat found inside the zoo’s aquarium complex tested positive for rabies and encouraged 186 people attending zoo camping events to seek treatment for rabies exposure.

The zoo noted that the bat was not part of its collection, but rather a wild bat that entered the aquarium.

According to the zoo, a guest attending an overnight campground in the aquarium building reported on July 4 that she woke up and noticed a wild bat near her head. She appeared to have no scratches or bite marks.

But because the bat flew away before it could be caught, the zoo’s veterinarian advised the woman to contact her doctor for the risk of rabies exposure.

The zoo says it notified the Douglas County Health Department, and a team from the zoo placed seven wild, small brown bats inside the aquarium. Everyone was killed. Only one of the seven tested positive for rabies.

According to the zoo, both the Nebraska State Veterinarian and the Nebraska Health Department recommended 186 guests staying in the aquarium on the night of July 2nd and 3rd as well as June 29th and 30th should receive rabies after exposure prophylaxis.

Each participant has been notified, including children and adults as well as some zoo staff. The zoo offers guests a refund for the camping events and it pays for rabies treatment after exposure.

Henry Doorly Zoo says overnight surveillance and other inspection efforts have found no other bats in the complex and no evidence of prolonged bat roasting.

Small brown bats are common in Nebraska, and it is not uncommon for a wild bat to be infected with rabies. The Nebraska Humane Society offers this advice on what to do if a bat is in your home.


Source link